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Crumbling foundations : the impact of failing public services on health and productivity.

by Fogden, Rosie.Centre for Progressive Policy.
Publisher: CPP, London 2023.Description: 11p.Summary: Poor health is doing profound harm to the wellbeing and productivity of the UK’s population, and social determinants of health are to blame. Educational disadvantage is the most significant social determinant of life expectancy while unemployment and income are leading determinants of health. These factors, along with others such as exposure to crime, are driving alarming disparities between the number of years people in England can expect to live in different places. To reverse these trends, improving outcomes across these social drivers of health must be a priority. This paper makes the economic case for investment in public services to improve population health, productivity and fiscal sustainability. It will be followed by a paper setting out national policy proposals for reform..Subject(s): public services | public expenditure | deprivation | wellbeing | wider determinants of health | financing | population health | health improvement | sustainability | productivity
Digital copyAvailability: Online access | Associated documentation List(s) this item appears in: Health inequalities [October 2023]
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Web publication The King's Fund Library Online resource Web publications and sites Web publications (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Not for loan

Poor health is doing profound harm to the wellbeing and productivity of the UK’s population, and social determinants of health are to blame. Educational disadvantage is the most significant social determinant of life expectancy while unemployment and income are leading determinants of health. These factors, along with others such as exposure to crime, are driving alarming disparities between the number of years people in England can expect to live in different places. To reverse these trends, improving outcomes across these social drivers of health must be a priority. This paper makes the economic case for investment in public services to improve population health, productivity and fiscal sustainability. It will be followed by a paper setting out national policy proposals for reform.

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